• Old Photos: Miss Mizzou

    After a popular post about the sorority girls of KU I searched the Life photo archives for something about the University of Missouri. There weren’t too many photographs but they led me to this interesting story.

    In 1959 the Life Magazine published an article Famous Cartoonists Share a Silver Jubilee. One of the cartoonists was the future Hall-of-Famer Milton Caniff – creator of the famous comic strip Steve Canyon.

    (Canyon) is so famous that Colorado changed the name of Squirrel Gulch to Steve Canyon. Columbia, Mo., home of “Old Mizzou” (student name for the University of Missouri), would have named a street after Caniff except the conservative citizens protested. They suspected Miss Mizzou, a Canyon dame, wears no clothes under her trench coat

    Infamous Miss Mizzou appears among other “ever-luscious ladies” who frequently graced the comic strip (sorry for the quality, I had to splice this from two sides of the magazine).

    Miss Mizzou
    Caniff's strange dames are luscious but for Canyon unattainable. These are Copper Calhoon,financier; Princess Snowflower, victim of Red Chinese; Convoy, lovable war waif; Poteet Canyon, a teenage kissin' cousin; Miss Mizzou from Missouri; Savannah Gay, actress; Summer Olson, sweet but married; Cheetah, the pert Oriental; Herself Muldoon, underworld queen; Gilberta Hall, blind and lovely; Doe Redwood, Pilot; Feeta-Feeta, secretary; Deen Wilderness, doctor; and Madame Lynx, spy. ©Time Inc.Milton Caniff

    Some sources report that Miss Mizzou, who was introduced in 1952, was patterned after Marilyn Monroe, others mention a model named Bek Stiner.

    Update: JB Winter of Mid-Missouri Comics Collective emailed me the following information:

    “For some time I had been mulling over a girl character who would be what a Marilyn Monroe type might be like if she had not hit the jackpot in Hollywood,” Caniff explained in a 1954 letter. “Every college town has girls who live and work on the edge of the campus and who are very much a part of the life of the school, but who who do not get invited to fraternity formals. Usually they come up from small towns and often become as loyal to the school as the best-heeled alumnae. I decided my gal wold be from the University of Missouri, if not of it.”

    But he did also base the character off of Bek Stiner (born Bek Nelson) too. He would often model new characters off of real people with the intention of having the photos of the model in the paper to publicize the strip.

    Even though Miss Mizzou was fictional, the street-naming fiasco mentioned in Life was real, warranting a humorous article in the 1958 Time Magazine:

    Faintly but distinctly, the mesmeric boomlay-boom of publicity drums on Manhattan’s Madison Ave. is heard 980 miles away in Columbia (pop. 43,000), site of the University of Missouri. Stout-souled citizens wonder what is wrong. Chamber of Commerce members writhe to the beat and get the message. It is so nonsensical that at first it seems to be garbled: name the new boulevard (boom-lay boom) after Milton Caniff.

    In the end, the name Providence Road won.

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  • Behind the Iron Curtain: Portyanki

    Memory is a strange thing. One minute I am reading a story about outpatient surgery in prison and the next minute it takes me back about 20 years when I was sitting in a small army hospital room and another soldier, who was supposed to be a nurse, was poking a scalpel at the infected cyst on my own foot. But this is not about some gruesome sadistic surgery forced on a newly drafted Soviet Soldier, although I still have a scar to show for it. This is a post about portyanki – a foot wrap worn in the Russian and later in the Soviet army instead of socks until just a year or two ago.

    After a long and tumultuous day of saying good-byes to civilian life and traveling by train and then inside a truck in the dark, lining up, multiple counts, marching with a group of half-scared schmucks and finally arriving at a place where most of us will spend the next two years, our group of fresh draftees finally settled down for an uneasy night of exhausted sleep. In the morning we were to shed whatever else connected us to our previous lives and become bona fide soldiers in the Soviet Army. After watching in horror other soldiers jump off their bunk-beds and stampede to their morning exercise routine we proceeded to the warehouse to receive our uniforms. The Soviet military uniform changed very little since WWII and there were always rumors of giant stashes of old uniforms sitting around waiting for the time “when enemy strikes”. The boots were the heavy non-laced kind from some fake leather material called kirza (sometimes translated as canvas, I am not exactly sure), uncomplicated by lining or any other comfort features. There were no socks, instead we received two pieces of cloth about the size, shape and thickness of a tea towel (13.6 by 35 inches) and some vague instructions about how to put them on. Given the quality of boots and the fact that this was the only kind of footwear for all occasions except for the rare weekend off, portyanki were not such a bad choice. What we didn’t realize was that putting them on correctly was an art, mastering which for most people required persistence, patience and a lot of foot damage. Another useful but unavailable at that time piece of information was that although the boot may have felt tight at first, getting a larger size was a big mistake. After some trial, error and confusion I ended up with a new uniform, two portyanki and a set of boots one or two sizes too large. Everything seemed to be OK until my first 10K run in full gear. During my whole life before that day my cumulative running distance equaled to about 10 or 20 kilometers. Needless to say that I crawled back half-dead with my portyanki bunched up inside my boots and a big bloody blister on one of my feet, which then got infected, blossomed into a big cyst and brought me to the scalpel wielding failed medical student from the beginning of this post. For the next two weeks one could tell inexperienced portyanki wearer by his distinct limp and walking around in slippers instead of boots. I almost had to wear slippers to my swearing-in ceremony but after the infamous surgery I recovered enough to fit in the boots again.

    I could go on and on about portyanki, about the summer and winter kinds, about the smell when everyone aired theirs at night (laundry was once a week), or about how I eventually mastered the art of putting them on and wore them until I was discharged even when I was allowed to wear normal socks. They were comfortable in the end, easier and faster to put on, warmer in winter and cooler during the summer. When I see American soldiers running around in sneakers I smile to myself: what a bunch of pussies! (I am kidding, do not write me threatening comments). For those of you who don’t believe me here is a short instructional video. And that’s, my American friends, how we won the cold war!

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  • Tebow Steals His Schtick From 1970’s KC Chiefs Player, Remains Unrepentant

    …although I don’t know if Charlie Getty actually prayed on the field. Probably not.

    Published in Kansas City Star, December 1979
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  • Old Photos: Victory Day

    Wilhelm Keitel signs the final German Act of Unconditional Surrender
    Wilhelm Keitel signs the final German Act of Unconditional Surrender © Time Inc.
    People eagerly reading New York World-Telegram newpapers w. the headline NAZIS GIVE UP/SURRENDER TO ALLIES AND RUSSIA ANNOUNCED, at newsstand in Times Square as people gather for massive end to war in Europe celebration.
    People eagerly reading New York World-Telegram newspapers w. the headline NAZIS GIVE UP/SURRENDER TO ALLIES AND RUSSIA ANNOUNCED, at newsstand in Times Square as people gather for massive end to war in Europe celebration.© Time Inc. Andreas Feininger
    Two million people gathered in Times Square to celebrate the end of the war in Europe.© Time Inc. Herbert Gehr
    Female Russian soldier grinning broadly while showing off her medals and a US Army Officers insignia pinned to her shirt after the Allied troops met following the fall of Berlin.
    Female Russian soldier grinning broadly while showing off her medals and a US Army Officer's insignia pinned to her shirt after the Allied troops met following the fall of Berlin.© Time Inc.William Vandivert
    Russian soldier standing amid rubble in Adolf Hitlers command bunker where he and his mistress Eva Braun were alleged to have committed suicide, under the Reichschancellery bldg.Russian soldier standing amid rubble in Adolf Hitlers command bunker where he and his mistress Eva Braun were alleged to have committed suicide, under the Reichschancellery bldg.
    Russian soldier standing amid rubble in Adolf Hitler's command bunker where he and his mistress Eva Braun were alleged to have committed suicide, under the Reichschancellery bldg.© Time Inc.William Vandivert
    US soldier talking with Russian soldier.
    US soldier talking with Russian soldier.© Time Inc.Walter Sanders
    Female Russian soldier and American trooper happily sitting together after meeting near the city of Torgau; by Davis Scherman & John Florea.
    Female Russian soldier and American trooper happily sitting together after meeting near the city of Torgau; © Time Inc.by Davis Scherman & John Florea.
    Russian Vistory Memorial in Treptow, Soviet sector of Berlin.
    Russian Victory Memorial in Treptow, Soviet sector of Berlin.© Time Inc.Carl Mydans
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  • Happy International Women’s Day!

    The 8th of March is The International Women’s Day – a celebration of women young and old, beautiful and smart, lovely, witty, (sometimes) funny, unique and irreplaceable. Thank you for letting us bask in all that.

    My feelings are best expressed by a Japanese Karaoke performer, whose song I was lucky to capture at the St.Louis Japanese Festival few years ago:

    httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mTsuGJM9mwE

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