Old Photos: Life On A Farm

This post is dedicated to my favorite farm-lady and the best commenter ever – Donna W. The following photos were taken in 1945 in Josephsville, MO. Narrated by some old guy.

In my day we didn’t have the Easter Egg Hunt, we had to hunt for eggs every day, because we were hungry, that’s why.

Close-up of girl collecting eggs from nest.

Close-up of girl collecting eggs from nest. © Time Inc.Wallace Kirkland

In my day there was no entertainment, we had to quilt all day long and listen to Eunice’s old jokes every day; that damn Eunice, I get a heartburn just thinking about her.

Women quilting.

Women quilting.© Time Inc.Wallace Kirkland

In my day kids didn’t sit around and watch TV, they had to haul firewood long distance uphill both ways, and only rich people could afford wheels.

Boy hauling in days supply of wood.

Boy hauling in days supply of wood.© Time Inc.Wallace Kirkland

In my day we didn’t go fishing for fun and we didn’t have us no fancy boats; we had to go catch us some dinner.

Farmer and son heading for pond to catch fish for dinner.

Farmer and son heading for pond to catch fish for dinner.© Time Inc.Wallace Kirkland

In my day we had to churn our own butter, and churn and churn and churn; damn kids get off my lawn!

Woman sitting in chair and churning butter.

Woman sitting in chair and churning butter.© Time Inc.Wallace Kirkland

In my day we only got to keep the back side of a cow, we had to sell the front half to the government.

Farmer milking cow.

Farmer milking cow.© Time Inc.Wallace Kirkland

In my day we couldn’t afford the rubber tires, you were lucky to get round wheels on your tractor. Have you ever tried tractoring with square wheels? I thought so!

Farmer sitting on plow.

Farmer sitting on plow.© Time Inc.Wallace Kirkland

In my day you’d already get yourself a whipping if you sat around and read all this stuff for this long. Damn whippersnappers!

  • I have a churn like the one in the picture. I probably won’t use it, though. I’d rather put the cream in a gallon jar and shake it. That way I can walk around, go outside, whatever, because I have one hand free.

    My grandma always had a quilt in the frame upstairs. In summer when weather was hot, she’d only quilt before noon, while it was cool. Otherwise she quilted after dinner, best I remember. She listened to soap operas on the radio then: I recall the name of one was “One Man’s Family”.

    And in MY day, we didn’t have television until I was thirteen years old! Seriously.