Old Photos: Kansas Wheat

Contrary to what some people believe I don’t own the idea of posting old photos from the Life Magazine Archives, but I do enjoy doing it, so here comes another set. These are combined under the tag Kansas Wheat and where taken in 1939. Some of the faces on these photos look like there were taken straight out of some Jimmy Stewart movie.

NEW CAMBRIA sign in front of a view of team of horses pulling a buck rake as SHELLBARGER flour mills can be seen in the background. in this big wheat farming community.© Time Inc.Margaret Bourke-White

Closeup of Kansas farmer.

Closeup of Kansas farmer.© Time Inc.Margaret Bourke-White

Young farm boy driving a team of horses pulling a wagon loaded with straw on a wheat farm.

Young farm boy driving a team of horses pulling a wagon loaded with straw on a wheat farm.© Time Inc.Margaret Bourke-White

Blue Ribbon Feeds store worker using handheld scale to weigh out the density of a pickup load of wheat brought to him for purchase to be sold as chicken feed.

Blue Ribbon Feeds store worker using handheld scale to weigh out the density of a pickup load of wheat brought to him for purchase to be sold as chicken feed.© Time Inc.Margaret Bourke-White

County agent Harold Harper at his desk in front of Kansas State College graph entitled Agricultural OUTLOOK PRICE TRENDS in his Harvey County office.

County agent Harold Harper at his desk in front of Kansas State College graph entitled “Agricultural OUTLOOK PRICE TRENDS”in his Harvey County office.© Time Inc.Margaret Bourke-White

Worker brushing paste on end edges of freshly-filled sacks which he will then put upside down (R) until the paste dries at WASHBURN'S GOLD MEDAL FLOUR mill.

Worker brushing paste on end edges of freshly-filled sacks which he will then put upside down (R) until the paste dries at WASHBURN’S GOLD MEDAL FLOUR mill.© Time Inc.Margaret Bourke-White

Warehouse worker wheeling colorfully printed flour sacks which housewives use to make dresses because the labels wash out, at Sunbonnet Sue flour mill.

Warehouse worker wheeling colorfully printed flour sacks which housewives use to make dresses because the labels wash out, at Sunbonnet Sue flour mill.© Time Inc.Margaret Bourke-White

Workers filliing colorfully printed flour sacks which housewives use to make dresses because the labels wash out, at Sunbonnet Sue flour mill.

Workers filliing colorfully printed flour sacks which housewives use to make dresses because the labels wash out, at Sunbonnet Sue flour mill.© Time Inc.Margaret Bourke-White

Here is a page about the flour sack dresses.

  • LIFE staff photographers consistently produced superb images that captured the essence of the times…