Stalin-bration’09

Every year an ever-expanding group of morons gathers to celebrate Stalin’s birthday and reminisce  about the greatness of the Stalin’s years in the Russian history. Considering that a person born in 1953 when Stalin died is quickly approaching  the age of 60, not too many people in the crowd actually remember the life under Stalin but that doesn’t stop them from marching around, dreaming about going back in time. The irony is in the fact that during Stalin’s times marching around or expressing disregard for the current regime would be a sure-fire way to get shot or be sent to labor camps.

Russian communists stand in line in Red square to attend a wreath laying ceremony at the tomb of Soviet dictator Josef Stalin marking the 130th anniversary of his birthday at the Kremlin wall in Moscow, December 21, 2009.

And here we see a group kids whose parents could use a few months of labor camps themselves.

Members of the youth wing of the Russian Communist party march along Red Square to lay flowers at Soviet dictator Josef Stalin's grave to mark the 130th anniversary of his birth in Moscow, Russia, Monday, Dec. 21, 2009.

Russian Communists hold red flags as they queue to lay flowers at the grave of Soviet dictator Josef Stalin to mark the 130th anniversary of his birth, as they walk along the Red Square in Moscow, Russia, Monday, Dec. 21, 2009. St Basil's Cathedral is seen at left and Lenin's mausoleum is at right.

Russian communists attend a wreath laying ceremony at the tomb of Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, marking the 130th anniversary of his birthday, at the Kremlin wall in Moscow December 21, 2009.

A Russian communist walks along Red Square after attending a wreath laying ceremony at the grave of Soviet dictator Josef Stalin marking the 130th anniversary of his birthday at the Kremlin wall in Moscow, December 21, 2009.

Russian Communists leader Gennady Zyuganov, 2nd left, smiles as others hold portraits of Soviet dictator Josef Stalin after laying flowers at his grave to mark the 130th anniversary of Stalin's birth Red Square in Moscow, Russia, Monday, Dec. 21, 2009.

Russian communists laugh in front of a McDonald's restaurant after attending a wreath laying ceremony at the grave of Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, marking the 130th anniversary of his birthday, at the Kremlin wall in Moscow December 21, 2009.

Few photos from Gori, Georgia where Stalin was born.

With a statue, background, and portrait, foreground, of Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, Georgians attend a rally marking his 130th birthday anniversary in Stalin's home town of Gori, 80 km (50 miles) west of the Georgian capital Tbilisi, Monday, Dec. 21, 2009.

Georgians carry portraits of Soviet dictator Josef Stalin during a rally marking his 130th birthday anniversary in Stalin's home town of Gori, 80 km (50 miles) west of the Georgian capital Tbilisi, Monday, Dec. 21, 2009.

  • midtown miscreant

    Funny how people remember things differently than they actually were. Case in point, the Kennedy years. People love to remember JFK as the guy who did all these great things, when you try to pin them down, half the shit they recall Kennedy doing, was actually done in Johnson’s presidency.

  • Double M is right. Kennedy was very good and public relations and relations with those other than his wife.. but didn’t accomplish much else… Papa Joe was a grandfatherly figure to much of the populace… not counting of course the agrarian peasants he slaughtered like cocks at a chicken ranch. Of course I once heard a Hungarian exchange student say in a high pitched whine, “well Hitler did some good things too” which is a little like saying, “Other than that Mrs. Lincoln how was the play.”

  • I travel for JOOLS

    I’ve never understood how people can ignore a truth that is right before them, in this case nearly 20 million graves. But they do, and not just in Russia.

  • Dave

    MM: I feel the same way about Reagan. People (even democrats) talk about how what a great republican president he was – yet when you look, he grew the size of federal government (by any measure), ballooned federal deficits, cut funding to many social programs (student aid, mental health, homeless services, etc), and removed some aspects of banking regulation which later led to the Savings and Loan Crisis. Somewhere in there, there was also a matter of trading military grade arms with terrorists for hostages — though I suspect historians will have much to learn about that over the next 20 years.

    Thats not why I commented, though.

    So Meesha – I read a recent Russian poll showed some 30% of the population wishes they had a leader like Stalin today (a number which is trending down over this decade from a high of about 1 in 2). Similarly, I understand that there are many Chinese who still admire Mao. The chinese situation is a little more understandable, I suppose since: 1) less time has gone by and 2) there probably isn’t so much room to inspect what Mao had done and criticize it in academic environments.

    Can you help me understand this? Does it have something to do with the favorable Soviet role during WWII ?

  • It’s similar to American nostalgia.I recently had a conversation at work about how people say “we want our country back” and “America is being destroyed”, etc. but if you think about it most Americans were never that well off. I recently watched “grapes of wrath” and how it showed that normal American people,white people from Oklahoma were treated like dirt,it wasn’t even racist.And before that Great Depression. And discrimination of women. And segregation. And Homophobia,etc. And even the morals that we associate with earlier days were all a lie (kinsey report_. Kennedy was a lie, and his brother RFK was a fake.In other words most people know it was all a lie and still swear that it was a better time and they want it back.
    During Stalin’s years many people felt more stability,living conditions improved,also don’t forget that propaganda associated his name with winning the war,although there is plenty of evidence to the contrary. People felt that he was honest, and caring, and knew what he was doing.But the truth was that old people who were getting pensions where always poor, and millions of people died,and there were labor camps,and arrests of innocent people,and that people where terrorized if they spoke up. But things also worked, mainly because everyone knew what happens if they didn’t. Many people would take crappy perception of stability over unpredictability and unreliability. So they’d rather stay poor but don’t worry about tomorrow, than wake up every day not knowing what will happen. Most of the Stalin lovers are people who didn’t make it in the new economy,although the way that was set up was scammy and unfair. Pension checks may not come on the expected date,it wouldn’t have happened when Stalin was around. And many other things seemed to be if not better, but at least they were there,and now they are not. People say:if Stalin was around he would’ve shot a few people here and there and things would get back on track. So let’s bring him back. That’s what I think.

  • Alex J.

    I wonder what Zyuganov is saying in that picture. “We should totally bring back absolute dictatorship. I know it might be hard to find just the right person willing to do the job, but hey, I humble present myself. When rodina asks I will answer the call. To tell you the truth, I’m rather looking forward to it. I’ve got my old high school yearbook out and I’ve circled all of my old classmates who are still alive for execution already. Gennady ‘Great Mountain Eagle’ Zyganov, I kind of like the ring of that…”

    • There are plenty of people who think that having a dictator is a great idea. They see corruption and think that in Stalin’s time these people would be shot or at least sent to camps.